Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Myth of Cost-Free Jurisdictional Reallocation

John B. Oakley
The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
Vol. 543, The Federal Role in Criminal Law (Jan., 1996), pp. 52-63
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1048447
Page Count: 12
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($40.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Myth of Cost-Free Jurisdictional Reallocation
Preview not available

Abstract

The recent trend to make federal crimes of essentially local criminal activity involving violence or drugs reflects the competing pressures on Congress and the president to maintain fiscal austerity while responding to public concerns that administration of the criminal law by state courts is ineffective. This trend has been encouraged by the myth that the federalization of crime is essentially cost free. In reality, this trend threatens serious harm to the ability of federal courts to perform their core functions, and to the ability of federal judges to discharge their duties with customary excellence. Rather than burdening the federal courts with these hidden institutional costs, Congress should recognize that there is no cost-free way to improve the administration of the criminal law, and despite the pressure to reduce federal spending, it should assist state courts with a substantial program of federal subsidization.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
52
    52
  • Thumbnail: Page 
53
    53
  • Thumbnail: Page 
54
    54
  • Thumbnail: Page 
55
    55
  • Thumbnail: Page 
56
    56
  • Thumbnail: Page 
57
    57
  • Thumbnail: Page 
58
    58
  • Thumbnail: Page 
59
    59
  • Thumbnail: Page 
60
    60
  • Thumbnail: Page 
61
    61
  • Thumbnail: Page 
62
    62
  • Thumbnail: Page 
63
    63