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Effects of Closed-Circuit Television on Crime

Brandon C. Welsh and David P. Farrington
The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
Vol. 587, Assessing Systematic Evidence in Crime and Justice: Methodological Concerns and Empirical Outcomes (May, 2003), pp. 110-135
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1049950
Page Count: 26
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Effects of Closed-Circuit Television on Crime
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Abstract

This article reports on the findings of a systematic review-incorporating meta-analytic techniques-of the available research evidence on the effects of closed-circuit television (CCTV) on crime in public space. A number of targeted and comprehensive searches of the published and unpublished literature and contacts with leading researchers produced twenty-two CCTV evaluations that met our criteria for inclusion in this review. CCTV had a significant desirable effect on crime, although the overall reduction in crime was a rather small 4 percent. All nine studies showing evidence of a desirable effect of CCTV on crime were carried out in the United Kingdom. Conversely, the other nine studies showing no evidence of any desirable effect of CCTV on crime included all five North American studies. CCTV was most effective in reducing crime in car parks. It had no effect on violent crimes but had a significant desirable effect on vehicle crimes.

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