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Integrated Schools in Northern Ireland

Seamus Dunn
Oxford Review of Education
Vol. 15, No. 2 (1989), pp. 121-128
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1049968
Page Count: 8
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Integrated Schools in Northern Ireland
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Abstract

Until recently the great majority of pupils in Northern Ireland attended schools associated with their own religion. Recently there have appeared a number of new, planned, religiously integrated schools and this movement has been given official support by the decision of the Department of Education for Northern Ireland to include a section in its new legislation which facilitates and promotes the development of integrated schools. This paper is concerned with trying to understand what it means to call a school integrated in the specific context of Northern Ireland. It describes three characteristics of the new schools: school membership, that is, the planned religious composition of the enrolment and staffing; the ethos of the school with regard to the two communities; and the role of parents in their management.

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