Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Are Summer-Born Children Disadvantaged? The Birthdate Effect in Education

John F. Bell and Sandra Daniels
Oxford Review of Education
Vol. 16, No. 1 (1990), pp. 67-80
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1050142
Page Count: 14
  • Download ($45.00)
  • Cite this Item
Are Summer-Born Children Disadvantaged? The Birthdate Effect in Education
Preview not available

Abstract

Summer-born children did not perform as well as autumn-born children on the APU Science Survey tests. There is bound to be some confounding of birthdate with length of schooling, but comparisons with foreign studies support the view that it is the age position of the pupil within the class that is the main explanatory factor for this performance difference. A hierarchical linear model (using HLM software) enabled evidence of a birthdate effect to be identified in the performance of pupils aged 11, 13 and 15. The effect is strong at the younger age but is still visible in the older age group. This paper urges teachers to acknowledge these artificial differences in performance when assigning pupils to different ability groupings related to National Assessment levels.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
67
    67
  • Thumbnail: Page 
68
    68
  • Thumbnail: Page 
69
    69
  • Thumbnail: Page 
70
    70
  • Thumbnail: Page 
71
    71
  • Thumbnail: Page 
72
    72
  • Thumbnail: Page 
73
    73
  • Thumbnail: Page 
74
    74
  • Thumbnail: Page 
75
    75
  • Thumbnail: Page 
76
    76
  • Thumbnail: Page 
77
    77
  • Thumbnail: Page 
78
    78
  • Thumbnail: Page 
79
    79
  • Thumbnail: Page 
80
    80