Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Education of the Emotions: The Rationality of Feeling

David Best
Oxford Review of Education
Vol. 14, No. 2 (1988), pp. 239-249
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1050459
Page Count: 11
  • Download ($44.00)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Education of the Emotions: The Rationality of Feeling
Preview not available

Abstract

This paper argues that it may well be the prevalent oversimple conceptions of emotional feelings and reason which explain what, on the face of it, is the extraordinary neglect of the education of the emotions. At first sight it would seem that this area is one of the most important in education. Yet it is rarely mentioned or considered, despite the only-too-obvious, numerous and disturbing explosions of distorted and frustrated emotional feeling in society generally. But is education of the emotions even a coherent possibility? On the common subjectivist conception, an emotion is a discrete inner feeling, independent of any external circumstance. On such a view the most that could be claimed is that emotions can be induced, certainly not educated. On the other hand, even if a more adequate conception of the emotions be provided, would not 'education' inevitably consist in, in effect, conditioning children and students into what to feel and what not to feel? I shall argue that much of the confusion derives from the still very common myth of the separate and opposed faculties of feeling and reason, often reflected in misguided curriculum practice. A more adequate account of feeling shows how education of emotions is a crucially important possibility, and that so far from imposing norms, it requires individual authenticity.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
239
    239
  • Thumbnail: Page 
240
    240
  • Thumbnail: Page 
241
    241
  • Thumbnail: Page 
242
    242
  • Thumbnail: Page 
243
    243
  • Thumbnail: Page 
244
    244
  • Thumbnail: Page 
245
    245
  • Thumbnail: Page 
246
    246
  • Thumbnail: Page 
247
    247
  • Thumbnail: Page 
248
    248
  • Thumbnail: Page 
249
    249