Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Two Philosophical Errors concerning School Choice

Harry Brighouse
Oxford Review of Education
Vol. 23, No. 4 (Dec., 1997), pp. 503-510
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1050865
Page Count: 8
  • Download ($45.00)
  • Cite this Item
Two Philosophical Errors concerning School Choice
Preview not available

Abstract

In his contribution to a recent symposium on school choice David Hargreaves makes two philosophical mistakes concerning the design of educational policy. The first is that libertarianism--the presumption that choice and diversity are desirable in social institutions--implies the presumption that choice is desirable in the design of educational institutions. I argue that libertarianism actually implies a mild presumption against choice in education. The second is that the common good is a significant factor to be weighed when thinking about how to design educational institutions. I argue that because educational institutions must mediate quite strict obligations that all adults have to each individual child as a matter of justice, the common good must be at most a secondary consideration, of significance only when deciding between sets of institutions which do equally well at delivering our obligations.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
503
    503
  • Thumbnail: Page 
504
    504
  • Thumbnail: Page 
505
    505
  • Thumbnail: Page 
506
    506
  • Thumbnail: Page 
507
    507
  • Thumbnail: Page 
508
    508
  • Thumbnail: Page 
509
    509
  • Thumbnail: Page 
510
    510