Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Using Community Adults as Advocates or Mentors for At-Risk Middle School Students: A Two-Year Evaluation of Project RAISE

James M. McPartland and Saundra Murray Nettles
American Journal of Education
Vol. 99, No. 4, Development and Education across Adolescence (Aug., 1991), pp. 568-586
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1085560
Page Count: 19
Were these topics helpful?
See somethings inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Using Community Adults as Advocates or Mentors for At-Risk Middle School Students: A Two-Year Evaluation of Project RAISE
Preview not available

Abstract

The effects on selected student outcomes are evaluated after two years of operation of Project RAISE, a multifaceted approach featuring outside adults as school-based advocates and one-on-one mentors for at-risk students at seven middle schools. Positive effects are found on improving student attendance and report card grades in English, but not on promotion rates or standardized test scores. The effects, though sizable, were not sufficient to neutralize the academic risks with which students entered the program. The positive results were primarily due to three of the seven sites. Some evidence supported interpretations that, although strong one-on-one mentoring is not an essential component of an effective program that uses outside adults to assist at-risk middle school students, the RAISE model is much more likely to show positive effects when one-on-one mentoring has been strongly implemented. Success may also depend on the size and composition of the student group to be served. Issues are raised about roles and responsibilities of adult advocates or mentors.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
568
    568
  • Thumbnail: Page 
569
    569
  • Thumbnail: Page 
570
    570
  • Thumbnail: Page 
571
    571
  • Thumbnail: Page 
572
    572
  • Thumbnail: Page 
573
    573
  • Thumbnail: Page 
574
    574
  • Thumbnail: Page 
575
    575
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[576]
    [576]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
577
    577
  • Thumbnail: Page 
578
    578
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[579]
    [579]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
580
    580
  • Thumbnail: Page 
581
    581
  • Thumbnail: Page 
582
    582
  • Thumbnail: Page 
583
    583
  • Thumbnail: Page 
584
    584
  • Thumbnail: Page 
585
    585
  • Thumbnail: Page 
586
    586