Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Complexity Levels, Habituation, and Individual Differences in Early Infancy

David J. Greenberg, William J. O'Donnell and Donald Crawford
Child Development
Vol. 44, No. 3 (Sep., 1973), pp. 569-574
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1128014
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1128014
Page Count: 6
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Complexity Levels, Habituation, and Individual Differences in Early Infancy
Preview not available

Abstract

To demonstrate a relationship between rate of habituation and complexity levels, 51 11-week-old infants were each given a rate-of-habituation test and a complexity-level test. As predicted, those infants who habituated rapidly (rapidly decreased their looking time to a single repeated stimulus in the habituation test) looked longer at the more complex patterns in the complexity test. The majority of infants with irregular habituation patterns resembled the slow habituators in terms of level of complexity preferred while the remaining irregular habituators appeared to respond randomly to both attentional tests.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[569]
    [569]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
570
    570
  • Thumbnail: Page 
571
    571
  • Thumbnail: Page 
572
    572
  • Thumbnail: Page 
573
    573
  • Thumbnail: Page 
574
    574