Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Evidence for the Understanding of Class Inclusion in Preschool Children: Linguistic Factors and Training Effects

Linda S. Siegel, Anne E. McCabe, Judith Brand and Janet Matthews
Child Development
Vol. 49, No. 3 (Sep., 1978), pp. 688-693
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1128236
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1128236
Page Count: 6
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Evidence for the Understanding of Class Inclusion in Preschool Children: Linguistic Factors and Training Effects
Preview not available

Abstract

3- and 4-year-old children were given tests of class inclusion reasoning using a standard Piagetian question format or an altered version which used no relational terminology. Many children were unable to solve the class inclusion problem in the traditional format but were able to do so in the altered version. Approximately half of the children received training in class inclusion reasoning. The remainder served as a control group and were administered the same questions as the training group but with no feedback about the correctness of their answers. In the posttest, the training group correctly answered more class inclusion questions than the control group. Thus, preschool children's failure to reason logically may be a result of immature language competence, not lack of reasoning skills. Theories which postulate inadequate logical reasoning in the young child appear to have limited generality.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[688]
    [688]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
689
    689
  • Thumbnail: Page 
690
    690
  • Thumbnail: Page 
691
    691
  • Thumbnail: Page 
692
    692
  • Thumbnail: Page 
693
    693