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Syntax Development in Boys and Girls

Roy A. Koenigsknecht and Philip Friedman
Child Development
Vol. 47, No. 4 (Dec., 1976), pp. 1109-1115
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1128449
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1128449
Page Count: 7
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Syntax Development in Boys and Girls
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Abstract

The Developmental Sentence Scoring (DSS) procedure was used to collect normative information about the syntax development of male and female children. Verbal samples in response to a variety of stimulus materials were collected from 20 male and 20 female normally developing children at 5 age levels (2, 3, 4, 5, 6 years). On several measures of sentence length and syntax maturity, girls averaged significantly higher scores than boys. Specific grammatical categories were also identified as important sex discriminators at different age levels. Significant female advantages began showing at the 4-year-old level, and became more evident with increasing age.

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