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Reliability of Standard English Differences among Black and White Children at Second, Fourth, and Seventh Grades

Samuel J. Marwit, Elaine F. Walker and Karen L. Marwit
Child Development
Vol. 48, No. 4 (Dec., 1977), pp. 1739-1742
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1128548
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1128548
Page Count: 4
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Reliability of Standard English Differences among Black and White Children at Second, Fourth, and Seventh Grades
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Abstract

A Berko-type task requiring subjects to derive the present, plural, possessive, and time-extension forms of nonsense syllables was administered cross-sectionally to a population of black and white second, fourth, and seventh graders. While subject race differences decreased progressively at each advancing grade level, the magnitude of these differences remained significant throughout. These results suggest that previous data, collected longitudinally, indicating nonsignificant subject race differences by seventh grade may have resulted more from methodological circumstances, that is, nonrandom attrition, than from true population characteristics.

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