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The Development of Gender Stereotyping of Adult Occupations in Elementary School Children

C. S. Garrett, P. L. Ein and L. Tremaine
Child Development
Vol. 48, No. 2 (Jun., 1977), pp. 507-512
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1128646
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1128646
Page Count: 6
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Abstract

355 first-, third-, and fifth-grade children from a middle-class school were asked to rate each of 40 adult occupations as male, female, or neutral, in terms of their attitudes about which sex has the abilities to do each job. Forced-choice responses included categories ranging from extremely sex typed (e. g., "only women"), moderately sex typed (e. g., "mostly men, a few women"), to neutral (e. g., "men and women"). Results indicated that, (1) for jobs stereotyped as neutral or male by the children, older children were more flexible in their stereotypes than younger children; (2) also within the neutral and male job classifications, males rated the jobs as more male oriented than did females; and (3) within the female job classification, there were no age or sex disagreements. These results are discussed in view of a sex-role-development model which utilizes the cognitive developmental processing changes proposed by Piaget in conjunction with social-learning mechanisms for acquiring cultural knowledge.

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