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Motor Activity, Anticipated Motor Activity, and Young Children's Associative Learning

Bruce G. Bender and Joel R. Levin
Child Development
Vol. 47, No. 2 (Jun., 1976), pp. 560-562
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1128822
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1128822
Page Count: 3
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Motor Activity, Anticipated Motor Activity, and Young Children's Associative Learning
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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine whether motor activity, previously assumed necessary to induce imagery in young children's associative learning, actually has to be executed. The results of our experiment with kindergartners clearly suggest not: In conditions where subjects simply planned an activity (without executing it), learning was enhanced. Further, the temporal proximity of the planning to the potential motor activity did not prove to be important. These results, combined with those from 2 follow-up experiments, give rise to the speculation-among others-that young children can be "tricked" into imagery generation through appropriately worded instructions.

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