Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Concentrations of Sex Hormones in Umbilical-Cord Blood: Their Relation to Sex and Birth Order of Infants

Eleanor E. Maccoby, Charles H. Doering, Carol Nagy Jacklin and Helena Kraemer
Child Development
Vol. 50, No. 3 (Sep., 1979), pp. 632-642
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1128928
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1128928
Page Count: 11
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Concentrations of Sex Hormones in Umbilical-Cord Blood: Their Relation to Sex and Birth Order of Infants
Preview not available

Abstract

In 3 groups of human newborns, 5 sex hormones were assayed from samples of umbilical-cord blood, and concentrations were analyzed by the sex and birth order of the infants. The 5 hormones assayed were testosterone, androstenedione, estrone, estradiol, and progesterone. Concentrations of testosterone were significantly greater in males than females. The other 4 hormones did not differ significantly by sex. In both sexes, firstborns had significantly more progesterone and estrogens, with progesterone showing the largest birth-order effects. Among male infants, firstborns had higher concentrations of testosterone. The higher concentrations of progesterone in firstborns of both sexes, and of testosterone in firstborn boys, were found not to be due to length of labor, birth weight, or maternal age. However, they were a function of temporal spacing of childbirths. Later borns who were closely spaced in relation to their next-older siblings had lower concentrations of hormones. The effect of temporal separation was greater on male than female infants for each of the 5 hormones studied. The results are discussed in terms of the possible effects of hormone "depletion" on the psychological development of closely spaced later borns.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[632]
    [632]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
633
    633
  • Thumbnail: Page 
634
    634
  • Thumbnail: Page 
635
    635
  • Thumbnail: Page 
636
    636
  • Thumbnail: Page 
637
    637
  • Thumbnail: Page 
638
    638
  • Thumbnail: Page 
639
    639
  • Thumbnail: Page 
640
    640
  • Thumbnail: Page 
641
    641
  • Thumbnail: Page 
642
    642