Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Sex Differences in Children's Risk-Taking Behavior

Harvey J. Ginsburg and Shirley M. Miller
Child Development
Vol. 53, No. 2 (Apr., 1982), pp. 426-428
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1128985
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1128985
Page Count: 3
Were these topics helpful?
See something inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Sex Differences in Children's Risk-Taking Behavior
Preview not available

Abstract

Sex differences in risk taking were examined by observing 480 3- to 11-year-old children at 4 different risk-taking locations at the San Antonio zoo. Frequency counts of boys and girls were made at the elephant rides, burro exhibit, children's petting zoo, and along a steep embankment of the San Antonio River. Baseline observations were made at the entrance of the zoo to ensure that boys and girls were equally represented. Girls were just as likely as boys to enter the zoo. However, at all 4 of the risk-taking situations, significantly more boys than girls engaged in risk-taking behavior. More boys than girls rode the elephants, petted the burro, fed the animals, and climbed the river embankment. Older boys and girls were more likely to take these risks than younger children. Thus, males, especially older ones, engaged in more risk-taking behavior than females within the context of this descriptive, naturalistic study.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[426]
    [426]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
427
    427
  • Thumbnail: Page 
428
    428