Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

A Cognitive-Developmental Approach to the Effects of Rewards on Intrinsic Motivation

Fred W. Danner and Edward Lonky
Child Development
Vol. 52, No. 3 (Sep., 1981), pp. 1043-1052
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1129110
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1129110
Page Count: 10
Were these topics helpful?
See something inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A Cognitive-Developmental Approach to the Effects of Rewards on Intrinsic Motivation
Preview not available

Abstract

2 experiments were conducted to examine the relationships between cognitive level, intrinsic motivation, and responses to extrinsic rewards and praise. In experiment 1, 90 4-10-year-old children were divided into 3 cognitive ability groups on the basis of their performance on a battery of classification tasks. When allowed to choose among learning centers which differed in the level of understanding of classification required, all 3 cognitive ability groups spent the most time in the centers which were just beyond their initial ability levels, and they rated these centers as most interesting and moderately difficult. In experiment 2, the children received either rewards, praise, or no rewards for working in a learning center which was either at, above, or below their predicted levels of classification interest. Rewards had little effect on intrinsic motivation among children whose motivation was initially low and decreased it among children whose motivation was initially high. Praise also had mixed effects-highly motivated children with an internal locus of control increased in intrinsic motivation following praise, while highly motivated children with an external locus of control decreased in intrinsic motivation following praise. The implications of these results for the understanding of intrinsic motivation and for educational practice were discussed.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[1043]
    [1043]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1044
    1044
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1045
    1045
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1046
    1046
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1047
    1047
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1048
    1048
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1049
    1049
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1050
    1050
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1051
    1051
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1052
    1052