Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Social Interaction in Hearing and Deaf Preschoolers: Successes and Failures in Initiations

Deborah Lowe Vandell and Linda B. George
Child Development
Vol. 52, No. 2 (Jun., 1981), pp. 627-635
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1129183
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1129183
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Social Interaction in Hearing and Deaf Preschoolers: Successes and Failures in Initiations
Preview not available

Abstract

Dyadic free play of 32 children (16 deaf, 16 hearing) who attended the same preschool was videotaped on 2 occasions, once with a hearing partner and once with a deaf partner. Each 15-min play session was analyzed in terms of the hearing and deaf children's initiation strategies, their responsiveness to one another's initiations, and the characteristics of successful and unsuccessful initiations. Results indicated that mean interaction duration and proportion of time spent in interaction were greater in "like" (hearing child and hearing partner or deaf child and deaf partner) as opposed to "mixed" dyads. Contrary to previous hypotheses about inadequate communication skills, deaf children were found to be persistent initiators who frequently combined social acts. Underlying similarities were also apparent in the types of initiating acts used by hearing and deaf children. At the same time, however, the deaf preschoolers encountered interaction difficulties. Their initiation attempts were more likely than those of their hearing counterparts to be actively refused. They were also more likely to be recipients of inappropriate initiations, such as gestures or vocalizations to their backs. These results were discussed in terms of previous hypotheses about inferior social skills of the deaf and for their relevance to programs interested in integrating hearing and nonhearing children.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[627]
    [627]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
628
    628
  • Thumbnail: Page 
629
    629
  • Thumbnail: Page 
630
    630
  • Thumbnail: Page 
631
    631
  • Thumbnail: Page 
632
    632
  • Thumbnail: Page 
633
    633
  • Thumbnail: Page 
634
    634
  • Thumbnail: Page 
635
    635