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The Relationship between Physical Growth and Infant Behavioral Development in Rural Guatemala

Robert E. Lasky, Robert E. Klein, Charles Yarbrough, Patricia L. Engle, Aaron Lechtig and Reynaldo Martorell
Child Development
Vol. 52, No. 1 (Mar., 1981), pp. 219-226
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1129234
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1129234
Page Count: 8
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The Relationship between Physical Growth and Infant Behavioral Development in Rural Guatemala
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Abstract

The present study investigated the relationship between a number of anthropometric indices and behavioral development during the first 2 years of life in rural Gautemala. Length and weight were the indices most strongly correlated with behavioral development. If the effect of the infant's length and weight was statistically controlled for, none of the other anthropometric variables explained a significant proportion of the variance in behavioral development. Controlling for length (or weight) assessed at the same age as the behavioral assessment, length (or weight) for younger ages was not significantly correlated with behavioral development. Changes in length or weight over time were correlated with changes in behavioral performance. We were unable to explain the association between physical growth and behavioral development by a number of variables including gestational age, nutrient intake, prevalence of disease, and familial characteristics.

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