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Journal Article

Effects of Peer Presence on Helping in Introverted and Extroverted Children

William Suda and Gregory Fouts
Child Development
Vol. 51, No. 4 (Dec., 1980), pp. 1272-1275
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1129571
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1129571
Page Count: 4
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Effects of Peer Presence on Helping in Introverted and Extroverted Children
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Abstract

The effects of peer presence and introversion-extroversion on children's helping in an emergency situation were examined. 38 introverted and 38 extroverted sixth-grade children were tested in the presence or absence of a same-sex confederate peer, with the emergency being sounds of distress in an adjoining room. In the presence of a peer, more extroverts actively helped than introverts, with no difference occurring for children tested alone. Collapsing over the peer-presence and peer-absence conditions, introverts and extroverts were found to prefer passive and active styles of helping, respectively.

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