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Effect of Perspective-Taking Training on Interpersonal Problem Solving

Diane T. Marsh, Felicisima C. Serafica and Carl Barenboim
Child Development
Vol. 51, No. 1 (Mar., 1980), pp. 140-145
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1129600
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1129600
Page Count: 6
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Effect of Perspective-Taking Training on Interpersonal Problem Solving
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Abstract

A study was undertaken to assess the effect of perspective-taking training on the ability to solve interpersonal problems. Subjects consisted of 2 classes of average-ability eighth-grade students. They were given the following measures before and after training: means-ends interpersonal problem solving, interpersonal problem analysis, social perspective taking, and affective perspective taking. Subjects in the experimental group received training in role playing designed to increase the ability to articulate and coordinate the relevant social perspectives in a social situation, as well as the internal states of individuals in that situation. The training did have a significant effect on interpersonal problem solving, but only on one measure of that ability (interpersonal problem analysis). There was no overall effect, however, on either measure of perspective taking, although there was some evidence that training stabilized preexisting levels of social perspective taking.

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