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Journal Article

Public School Aggression among Children with Varying Day-Care Experience

Ron Haskins
Child Development
Vol. 56, No. 3 (Jun., 1985), pp. 689-703
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1129759
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1129759
Page Count: 15
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Public School Aggression among Children with Varying Day-Care Experience
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Abstract

59 children with varying amounts and types of day-care experience were followed over their first 2 or 3 years of public schooling. Schoolteachers rated aggressiveness of several types and in several situations by these children, and also supplied information about managing the children, about children's use of strategies to avoid conflict, and about several associated skills and behaviors. Multivariate analyses indicated that children who had attended a cognitively oriented day-care program beginning in infancy were more aggressive than all other groups of children who had attended day care. Aggression among these children, however, declined over time, the children were not considered difficult to manage, and they were well liked by teachers. It was speculated that the increased aggressiveness among children attending cognitively oriented day care may have been caused by several problems of adaptation to the school setting.

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