Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Growth-Produced Changes in Body Shape and Size as Determinants of Perceived Age and Adult Caregiving

Thomas R. Alley
Child Development
Vol. 54, No. 1 (Feb., 1983), pp. 241-248
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1129882
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1129882
Page Count: 8
  • Get Access
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Growth-Produced Changes in Body Shape and Size as Determinants of Perceived Age and Adult Caregiving
Preview not available

Abstract

The ethological hypothesis that "parental" caregiving can be elicited by certain physical characteristics of infants was investigated in 3 experiments. In Experiments 1 and 2, adults' responses to line drawings of humans varying only in size or body proportions showed that the reported tendency to protect others decreases as the size and shape of the recipient's body changes due to growth. In the third experiment, the rated cuddliness of the drawings varying in body proportions also decreased as their portrayed age increased. The changes in body proportions were found to be an effective source of information for relative age. These results support the ethological view that individuals who appear more youthful in terms of body size or shape are more likely to be recipients of adult caretaking.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[241]
    [241]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
242
    242
  • Thumbnail: Page 
243
    243
  • Thumbnail: Page 
244
    244
  • Thumbnail: Page 
245
    245
  • Thumbnail: Page 
246
    246
  • Thumbnail: Page 
247
    247
  • Thumbnail: Page 
248
    248