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A Developmental Analysis of the Relation between Peer Acceptance and Both Interpersonal Understanding and Perceived Social Self-Competence

Lawrence A. Kurdek and Donna Krile
Child Development
Vol. 53, No. 6, Early Adolescence (Dec., 1982), pp. 1485-1491
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1130075
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1130075
Page Count: 7
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A Developmental Analysis of the Relation between Peer Acceptance and Both Interpersonal Understanding and Perceived Social Self-Competence
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Abstract

This report explored the relation between children's peer acceptance and both interpersonal understanding and perceived social self-competence in samples of children grade 3-8. In addition, it examined correspondences between pairs of mutual friends, unilateral friends, and nonfriends for these 2 variables. Interpersonal understanding showed significant developmental increases; girls performed significantly better than boys. Children's favored peer status was related to high levels of both interpersonal understanding and perceived social self-competence, with the relation between peer acceptance and interpersonal understanding being stronger for older than for younger children. Compared with unilateral friends and nonfriends, mutual friends were more similar to each other on both interpersonal understanding and perceived social self-competence. Results are interpreted in light of recent conceptual and methodological advances in the study of children's peer relations.

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