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Home Environment and School Performance: A Ten-Year Follow-Up and Examination of Three Models of Environmental Action

Robert H. Bradley, Bettye M. Caldwell and Stephen L. Rock
Child Development
Vol. 59, No. 4 (Aug., 1988), pp. 852-867
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1130253
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1130253
Page Count: 16
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Home Environment and School Performance: A Ten-Year Follow-Up and Examination of Three Models of Environmental Action
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Abstract

The home environments of 42 10- and 11-year-old children were examined when they were infants and again during middle childhood. Significant correlations were observed between home environments measured at both 2 years and 10 years and the children's SRA achievement test scores and their classroom behavior. However, the home environment at 6 months was only related to a limited number of classroom behaviors. Partial correlations were used to test 3 models of environmental action: Model I (primacy of early experience), Model II (predominance of the contemporary environment), Model III (cumulative effects in stable environments). Strongest relations were noted for the contemporary environment, but all 3 models received some support. Correlations between HOME scores and children's competence in middle childhood revealed a complex portrait that was not explainable with reference to a single model of environmental action. The version of the HOME Inventory used with families of elementary school children is also introduced.

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