Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Control and Early Socioemotional Development: Infant Rhesus Monkeys Reared in Controllable versus Uncontrollable Environments

Susan Mineka, Megan Gunnar and Maribeth Champoux
Child Development
Vol. 57, No. 5 (Oct., 1986), pp. 1241-1256
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1130447
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1130447
Page Count: 16
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Control and Early Socioemotional Development: Infant Rhesus Monkeys Reared in Controllable versus Uncontrollable Environments
Preview not available

Abstract

The effects of controllable versus uncontrollable appetitive stimulation on socioemotional development were studied in 20 infant rhesus monkeys reared in 5 peer groups consisting of 4 monkeys each. In 2 groups (Masters), subjects had access to operant manipulanda that permitted them to control the delivery of food, water, and treats. In 2 other groups (Yoked), subjects received access to these reinforcers noncontingently. In a fifth group (Standard Rearing Control), subjects were reared in a standard laboratory cage without access to the manipulanda and the variety of reinforcers available in the Master and Yoked groups. Subjects were introduced to these rearing environments during the second month of life; during the second half of the first year, tests of socioemotional behavior commenced. Results indicated that Master subjects displayed less fear, as measured by reactions to a mechanical toy robot, and exhibited more exploratory behavior, as measured by responses to a standard primate playroom, than did Yoked subjects. Master and Yoked subjects did not differ on measures of response to social separation from peers, unless opportunities to make active coping attempts were provided, in which case Master subjects appeared to adapt or cope better. On most measures, Yoked subjects did not differ from Standard Rearing Controls. Thus the above results could be attributed to the effects of experience with increased control over appetitive environmental events rather than to the effects of prolonged exposure to noncontingent or uncontrollable appetitive stimulation.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[1241]
    [1241]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1242
    1242
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1243
    1243
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1244
    1244
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1245
    1245
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[1246]
    [1246]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1247
    1247
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1248
    1248
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1249
    1249
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1250
    1250
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1251
    1251
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1252
    1252
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1253
    1253
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1254
    1254
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1255
    1255
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1256
    1256