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A Longitudinal Study of Children with Day-Care Experiences of Varying Quality

Deborah Lowe Vandell, V. Kay Henderson and Kathy Shores Wilson
Child Development
Vol. 59, No. 5 (Oct., 1988), pp. 1286-1292
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1130491
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1130491
Page Count: 7
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A Longitudinal Study of Children with Day-Care Experiences of Varying Quality
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Abstract

20 white, middle-class 4-year-olds were observed during free play at good and poor quality day-care centers and again at 8 years as they participated in triadic play sessions. Maternal, peer, and observer ratings were obtained. Hierarchical regressions were used to determine the effects of day-care quality after removing the effects of family social class. Compared to children from poorer quality day-care, children from better quality day-care had more friendly interactions and fewer unfriendly interactions with peers, were rated as more socially competent and happier, and received fewer "shy" nominations from peers. Significant continuity between the 4-year-olds' behaviors in the day-care centers and the children's functioning at 8 years was found. Positive interaction with adults at 4 years was positively related to ratings of empathy, social competence, and peer acceptance at 8 years, while unoccupied behavior at 4 years was negatively related to ratings of empathy, conflict negotiation, and social competence at 8 years.

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