Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Cognitive Aspects of Early Sex-Role Development: The Influence of Gender Schemas on Preschoolers' Memories and Preferences for Sex-Typed Toys and Activities

D. Bruce Carter and Gary D. Levy
Child Development
Vol. 59, No. 3 (Jun., 1988), pp. 782-792
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1130576
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1130576
Page Count: 11
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Cognitive Aspects of Early Sex-Role Development: The Influence of Gender Schemas on Preschoolers' Memories and Preferences for Sex-Typed Toys and Activities
Preview not available

Abstract

60 33-68-month-old children were interviewed to assess relations among sex-stereotype knowledge, stereotype flexibility, gender constancy, sex-typed toy preferences, gender schematization, and recognition memory for gender-relevant illustrations. Age was positively associated with recognition memory for stereotype-consistent and inconsistent activities and negatively associated with simple recognition errors. Gender schematization was negatively associated with memory for stereotype-inconsistent activities and positively associated with gender transformational memory errors. Boys' toy preferences were more stereotype consistent and, for all children, preferences for sex-appropriate toys were positively associated with age and gender schematization. Sex-inappropriate preferences were negatively associated with gender schematization. Neither stereotype knowledge, stereotype flexibility, nor gender constancy reliably predicted memories or preferences.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[782]
    [782]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
783
    783
  • Thumbnail: Page 
784
    784
  • Thumbnail: Page 
785
    785
  • Thumbnail: Page 
786
    786
  • Thumbnail: Page 
787
    787
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[788]
    [788]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
789
    789
  • Thumbnail: Page 
790
    790
  • Thumbnail: Page 
791
    791
  • Thumbnail: Page 
792
    792