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Childhood Derivatives of Inhibition and Lack of Inhibition to the Unfamiliar

Jerome Kagan, J. Steven Reznick, Nancy Snidman, Jane Gibbons and Maureen O. Johnson
Child Development
Vol. 59, No. 6 (Dec., 1988), pp. 1580-1589
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1130672
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1130672
Page Count: 10
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Childhood Derivatives of Inhibition and Lack of Inhibition to the Unfamiliar
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Abstract

Behavioral and physiological assessments of 41 7½-year-old children who had been selected to be inhibited or uninhibited at 21 months and observed again at 4 and 5½ years revealed that each of the 2 original behavioral profiles predicted theoretically reasonable derivatives. A majority of the formerly shy, timid children became quiet and socially avoidant in unfamiliar social situations, while a majority of the formerly sociable children became talkative and interactive with peers and adults. Absolute heart-rate and cortisol level at 7½ years were not as discriminating of the 2 behavioral groups as they had been 2 years earlier.

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