Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Children's Reports of Conflict between Simultaneous Opposite-Valence Emotions

Nancy Rumbaugh Whitesell and Susan Harter
Child Development
Vol. 60, No. 3 (Jun., 1989), pp. 673-682
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1130732
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1130732
Page Count: 10
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Children's Reports of Conflict between Simultaneous Opposite-Valence Emotions
Preview not available

Abstract

This study investigated children's reports of their experiences of simultaneous different-valence emotions and examined whether such reports included indications of internal conflict or ambivalence. A structured interview and a procedure to assess internal emotional conflict were developed and administered to children aged 9-12. Our findings call into question previous assumptions about the necessary presence of conflict. Children reported conflict in slightly less than half of the multiple-emotion experiences they described. When conflict was reported, children convincingly recounted a dynamic interaction between the 2 feelings, often personifying the feelings as arguing over what to do or which feeling should predominate. When children described the absence of conflict, they often emphasized the lack of distress accompanying the feelings or pointed out that the situation was relatively unimportant. Reports of conflict were related to the degree to which the positive or negative emotion was stronger and to the perceived similarity or dissimilarity of the 2 emotions: Conflict was most likely when the negative emotion was reported to be equal to or more intense than the positive emotion and when the 2 emotions were perceived to be different.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[673]
    [673]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
674
    674
  • Thumbnail: Page 
675
    675
  • Thumbnail: Page 
676
    676
  • Thumbnail: Page 
677
    677
  • Thumbnail: Page 
678
    678
  • Thumbnail: Page 
679
    679
  • Thumbnail: Page 
680
    680
  • Thumbnail: Page 
681
    681
  • Thumbnail: Page 
682
    682