Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Development of Verb Concepts: Children's Use of Verbs to Label Familiar and Novel Events

Douglas A. Behrend
Child Development
Vol. 61, No. 3 (Jun., 1990), pp. 681-696
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1130953
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1130953
Page Count: 16
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Development of Verb Concepts: Children's Use of Verbs to Label Familiar and Novel Events
Preview not available

Abstract

The importance of actions, results, and instruments in verb concepts was examined in four studies. Study 1 investigated how children label familiar events for which instrument, action, and result verbs were appropriate labels. In Study 2, subjects were taught novel verbs and were asked to use these verbs to label events in which the instrument, action, or result had been changed. Study 1 showed that 3-year-olds used action verbs more frequently than older children and adults, and that they preferred to use an action verb over a result verb when both verbs were appropriate labels. Instrument verbs were used most frequently as first responses to the events, and were most frequently used by older children and adults. In Study 2, subjects were least likely to use the novel verbs to label events in which the result had changed. This effect increased with age. Action changes had a moderate effect for all age groups, while instrument changes had the weakest effect. Studies 3 and 4 ruled out stimulus salience and a familiar word strategy as interpretations of these findings. The studies are discussed in terms of current theory and research on conceptual development, word-learning strategies, and the semantic organization of nouns and verbs.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[681]
    [681]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
682
    682
  • Thumbnail: Page 
683
    683
  • Thumbnail: Page 
684
    684
  • Thumbnail: Page 
685
    685
  • Thumbnail: Page 
686
    686
  • Thumbnail: Page 
687
    687
  • Thumbnail: Page 
688
    688
  • Thumbnail: Page 
689
    689
  • Thumbnail: Page 
690
    690
  • Thumbnail: Page 
691
    691
  • Thumbnail: Page 
692
    692
  • Thumbnail: Page 
693
    693
  • Thumbnail: Page 
694
    694
  • Thumbnail: Page 
695
    695
  • Thumbnail: Page 
696
    696