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The Effects of Training in Social Perspective Taking on Socially Maladjusted Girls

Jennifer B. Chalmers and Michael A. R. Townsend
Child Development
Vol. 61, No. 1 (Feb., 1990), pp. 178-190
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1131057
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1131057
Page Count: 13
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The Effects of Training in Social Perspective Taking on Socially Maladjusted Girls
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Abstract

A paucity of research exists concerning training programs for the development of interpersonal functioning in socially maladjusted or delinquent adolescent females. Females in a residential institution participated in a role-play program designed to enhance social perspective-taking ability. In 15 sessions girls were coached in specific social skills and acted multiple role perspectives in typical problem situations. Compared to girls in a fitness training program, girls in the role-play training program showed enhanced performance on a measure of social perspective taking. Generalized effects were also found for performance on tests of interpersonal problem analysis, empathy, and the acceptance of individual differences. Additionally, observational data indicated that role-play training resulted in increased prosocial behaviors. Role-play training had no effect on a measure of referential communication.

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