Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Infants' Contribution to the Achievement of Joint Reference

Dare A. Baldwin
Child Development
Vol. 62, No. 5 (Oct., 1991), pp. 875-890
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1131140
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1131140
Page Count: 16
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Infants' Contribution to the Achievement of Joint Reference
Preview not available

Abstract

This research examines whether infants actively contribute to the achievement of joint reference. One possibility is that infants tend to link a label with whichever object they are focused on when they hear the label. If so, infants would make a mapping error when an adult labels a different object than the one occupying their focus. Alternatively, infants may be able to use a speaker's nonverbal cues (e. g., line of regard) to interpret the reference of novel labels. This ability would allow infants to avoid errors when adult labels conflict with infants' focus. 64 16-19-month-olds were taught new labels for novel toys in 2 situations. In follow-in labeling, the experimenter looked at and labeled a toy at which infants were already looking. In discrepant labeling, the experimenter looked at and labeled a different toy than the one occupying infants' focus. Infants' responses to subsequent comprehension questions revealed that they (a) successfully learned the labels introduced during follow-in labeling, and (b) displayed no tendency to make mapping errors after discrepant labeling. Thus infants of only 16 to 19 months understand that a speaker's nonverbal cues are relevant to the reference of object labels; they already can contribute to the social coordination involved in achieving joint reference.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[875]
    [875]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
876
    876
  • Thumbnail: Page 
877
    877
  • Thumbnail: Page 
878
    878
  • Thumbnail: Page 
879
    879
  • Thumbnail: Page 
880
    880
  • Thumbnail: Page 
881
    881
  • Thumbnail: Page 
882
    882
  • Thumbnail: Page 
883
    883
  • Thumbnail: Page 
884
    884
  • Thumbnail: Page 
885
    885
  • Thumbnail: Page 
886
    886
  • Thumbnail: Page 
887
    887
  • Thumbnail: Page 
888
    888
  • Thumbnail: Page 
889
    889
  • Thumbnail: Page 
890
    890