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Enhancing Maternal Interactive Behavior and Child Social Competence in Low Birth Weight, Premature Infants

Donna Spiker, Joan Ferguson and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn
Child Development
Vol. 64, No. 3 (Jun., 1993), pp. 754-768
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1131216
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1131216
Page Count: 15
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Enhancing Maternal Interactive Behavior and Child Social Competence in Low Birth Weight, Premature Infants
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Abstract

Effects of a comprehensive early intervention program for low birth weight, premature infants-the Infant Health and Development Program-on mother-child interaction were examined at 30 months (N = 683). Small significant positive effects were found: Intervention mothers had higher ratings on quality of assistance; intervention children had higher ratings on persistence and enthusiasm and on an overall child rating of competence and involvement and lower ratings on percentage of time off-task; intervention dyads were rated as more synchronous. Of a set of initial status variables indexing biological and environmental risk, only 2 treatment interactions were found. Intervention group black children had higher ratings on enthusiasm and lower percentage of time off-task. Independent of treatment, maternal ethnicity and education were significant predictors of maternal and dyadic ratings, while ethnicity and birth weight predicted child ratings. Implications for early intervention and center-based care are discussed.

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