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Heterogeneity among Peer-Rejected Boys: Subtypes and Stabilities

Antonius H. N. Cillessen, Hendrik W. van IJzendoorn, Cornelis F. M. van Lieshout and Willard W. Hartup
Child Development
Vol. 63, No. 4 (Aug., 1992), pp. 893-905
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1131241
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1131241
Page Count: 13
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Heterogeneity among Peer-Rejected Boys: Subtypes and Stabilities
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Abstract

Cluster analysis was used to identify subtypes among 98 peer-rejected 5-7-year-old boys. Repeated sociometric nominations obtained over a 1-year interval permitted examination of the relation between rejection subtype and sociometric stability. Results revealed that 48% of these rejected boys were aggressive, impulsive, disruptive, and noncooperative as well as not involved in mutual liking. A smaller number (13%) were socially shy, perceived themselves to be negatively regarded by their peers, and were uninvolved in mutual liking. Two other subtypes, accounting for 39% of these boys, did not seem especially deviant. These behavioral characteristics generally typified the four rejection subtypes 1 year later. 66% of the nonaggressive subtypes changed sociometric classification (i. e., became average or popular) after a year, whereas only 42% of the aggressive-rejected children did so, suggesting that peer rejection that involves aggression is more stable than rejection that does not.

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