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The Relations of Emotionality and Regulation to Children's Anger-Related Reactions

Nancy Eisenberg, Richard A. Fabes, Mia Nyman, Jane Bernzweig and Angel Pinuelas
Child Development
Vol. 65, No. 1 (Feb., 1994), pp. 109-128
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1131369
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1131369
Page Count: 20
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The Relations of Emotionality and Regulation to Children's Anger-Related Reactions
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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the relations of emotionality (intensity and negative emotion) and regulation (attentional control, mode of coping) to preschoolers' naturally occurring anger reactions. School personnel's ratings of 4-6-year-olds' constructive coping and attentional control were associated with boys' constructive anger reactions whereas their ratings of acting out versus avoidant coping, emotional intensity, and anger intensity generally were correlated with low levels of constructive reactions to anger. Mothers' reports of children's constructive coping and low emotional intensity were associated with children's use of nonabusive language to deal with anger, whereas aggressive coping and negative emotionality were associated with escape behavior when angered. The findings are consistent with the conclusion that individual differences in emotionality and regulatory skills are associated with children's constructive versus nonconstructive anger reactions.

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