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Parents' Involvement in Children's Schooling: A Multidimensional Conceptualization and Motivational Model

Wendy S. Grolnick and Maria L. Slowiaczek
Child Development
Vol. 65, No. 1 (Feb., 1994), pp. 237-252
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1131378
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1131378
Page Count: 16
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Parents' Involvement in Children's Schooling: A Multidimensional Conceptualization and Motivational Model
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Abstract

This study had 2 goals. The first was to examine a multidimensional conceptualization of parent involvement in children's schooling, defined as the allocation of resources to the child's school endeavors. A second goal was to evaluate a model in which children's motivational resources (i. e., perceived competence, control understanding, and self-regulation) are mediators between parent involvement and children's school performance. 300 11-14-year-old children and their teachers participated. Factor analyses of a set of parent involvement measures supported the hypothesized 3 dimensions of parent involvement: behavior, intellectual/cognitive, and personal. Path analyses revealed indirect effects of mother behavior and intellectual/cognitive involvement on school performance through perceived competence and control understanding, and indirect effects of father behavior on school performance through perceived competence. The results argue against a unidimensional understanding of parent involvement and support the view of the child as an active constructor of his or her school experience.

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