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Perceptions and Evaluations of Child Transgressions and Disciplinary Techniques in High- and Low-Risk Mothers and Their Children

Chinni Chilamkurti and Joel S. Milner
Child Development
Vol. 64, No. 6 (Dec., 1993), pp. 1801-1814
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1131470
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1131470
Page Count: 14
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Abstract

Perceptions and evaluations of children's transgressions (moral, conventional, personal), parental disciplinary actions (power assertion, love withdrawal, induction), and expected outcomes (compliance) were assessed in matched high- and low-risk (for physical abuse) mothers and their children. High-risk mothers and their children evaluated conventional and personal transgressions as more wrong than low-risk mothers and their children. Although both high- and low-risk mothers and their children varied disciplinary responses according to the type of transgression, high-risk mothers used power assertion (verbal and physical force) more often and induction (reasoning and explanation) less often. High-risk mothers also perceived the use of power assertion by others as more appropriate. With respect to outcomes, high-risk mothers, compared to low-risk mothers, expected less compliance following moral transgressions and more compliance after personal transgressions. Children of both high-and low-risk mothers made compliance predictions following moral and personal transgressions that were similar to the low-risk mothers' predictions.

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