Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Development of Affiliative and Agonistic Social Patterns in Differentially Reared Monkeys

Michael W. Andrews and Leonard A. Rosenblum
Child Development
Vol. 65, No. 5 (Oct., 1994), pp. 1398-1404
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1131506
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1131506
Page Count: 7
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Development of Affiliative and Agonistic Social Patterns in Differentially Reared Monkeys
Preview not available

Abstract

Bonnet macaques that had been reared from 3 to 6 months of age in experimental environments that appeared to adversely affect their ability to separate from mother to explore a novel physical environment in dyadic assessments shortly after the rearing experience were tested during late adolescence, an average of 2.5 years later, under conditions of increasing unfamiliarity and complexity of the social milieu. 6 monkeys, the low-foraging-demand (LFD) group, were reared by mothers having constant easy access to food during the experimental rearing period. Another 6 monkeys, the variable-foraging-demand (VFD) group, were reared by mothers having a foraging task that varied between easy and difficult in 2-week blocks during the experimental rearing period. Although no treatment group differences were evident during the initial rearing period, during subsequent social challenges VFD monkeys exhibited a diminished capacity for affiliative social engagement relative to LFD monkeys and were socially subordinate to LFD monkeys.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[1398]
    [1398]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1399
    1399
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1400
    1400
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1401
    1401
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1402
    1402
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1403
    1403
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1404
    1404