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Temperament, Emotion, and Cognition at Fourteen Months: The MacArthur Longitudinal Twin Study

Robert N. Emde, Robert Plomin, JoAnn Robinson, Robin Corley, John DeFries, David W. Fulker, J. Steven Reznick, Joseph Campos, Jerome Kagan and Carolyn Zahn-Waxler
Child Development
Vol. 63, No. 6 (Dec., 1992), pp. 1437-1455
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1131567
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1131567
Page Count: 19
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Temperament, Emotion, and Cognition at Fourteen Months: The MacArthur Longitudinal Twin Study
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Abstract

200 pairs of twins were assessed at 14 months of age in the laboratory and home. Measures were obtained of temperament, emotion, and cognition/language. Comparisons between identical and fraternal twin correlations suggest that individual differences are due in part to heritable influences. For temperament, genetic influence was significant for behavioral observations of inhibition to the unfamiliar, tester ratings of activity, and parental ratings of temperament. For emotion, significant genetic influence was found for empathy and parental ratings of negative emotion. The estimate of heritability for parental report of expression of negative emotions was relatively high, whereas that for expression of positive emotions was low, a finding consistent with previous research. For cognition and language, genetic influence was significant for behavioral indices of spatial memory, categorization, and word comprehension. Shared rearing environment appears influential for parental reports of language and for positive emotions, but not for other measures of emotion or for temperament.

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