Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Neither Too Sweet nor Too Sour: Problem Peers, Maternal Control, and Problem Behavior in African American Adolescents

Craig A. Mason, Ana Mari Cauce, Nancy Gonzales and Yumi Hiraga
Child Development
Vol. 67, No. 5 (Oct., 1996), pp. 2115-2130
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1131613
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1131613
Page Count: 16
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Neither Too Sweet nor Too Sour: Problem Peers, Maternal Control, and Problem Behavior in African American Adolescents
Preview not available

Abstract

This study examined whether maternal control protects African American adolescents from the negative influence of problem peers. Two forms of control were examined, behavioral control and psychological control. It was hypothesized that there would be a curvilinear relation between control and adolescent problem behavior, with the strength of the relationship and the amount of control optimal for adolescent development varying by the level of peer problem behavior. In general, data supported this model, particularly in regard to behavioral control, where the predicted curvilinear interaction occurred even after controlling for initial levels of problem behavior. The predicted curvilinear interaction between psychological control and peer problem behavior was statistically significant if initial levels of problem behavior were not controlled for but was not significant after controlling for initial problem behavior. These findings suggest that high-quality parenting can play a modest but critical role in the face of environmental adversity.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[2115]
    [2115]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2116
    2116
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2117
    2117
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2118
    2118
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2119
    2119
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2120
    2120
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2121
    2121
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2122
    2122
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2123
    2123
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2124
    2124
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2125
    2125
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2126
    2126
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2127
    2127
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2128
    2128
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2129
    2129
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2130
    2130