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Interactions between Family Environment and Friendship and Associations with Self-Perceived Well-Being during Early Adolescence

Cyma Gauze, William M. Bukowski, Jasmin Aquan-Assee and Lorrie K. Sippola
Child Development
Vol. 67, No. 5 (Oct., 1996), pp. 2201-2216
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1131618
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1131618
Page Count: 16
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Interactions between Family Environment and Friendship and Associations with Self-Perceived Well-Being during Early Adolescence
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Abstract

Using a sample of 138 early adolescents and their parents, we examined the hypothesis that family and friendship measures would moderate each other's associations with measures of children's perceptions of their adjustment and well-being. Family environment was assessed by asking parents to complete the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Scale II. A sociometric nomination procedure and the Friendship Quality Scale were completed by the subjects as assessments of reciprocity and quality in their best friendship relations. The Perceived Competence Scale for Children was used to assess children's adjustment. Stronger associations were observed between the family measures and the adjustment measures in children without a close friendship than in children with such a relationship. Also, friendship was more strongly linked to outcome measures for children from low adaptive and low cohesive families than for children in more adaptive and cohesive families. These findings indicate that experiences in the family and friendship domains interact in their associations with children's impressions of their adjustment during early adolescence.

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