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Journal Article

Depressed Mothers' Touching Increases Infants' Positive Affect and Attention in Still-Face Interactions

Martha Peláez-Nogueras, Tiffany M. Field, Ziarat Hossain and Jeffrey Pickens
Child Development
Vol. 67, No. 4 (Aug., 1996), pp. 1780-1792
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1131731
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1131731
Page Count: 13
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Depressed Mothers' Touching Increases Infants' Positive Affect and Attention in Still-Face Interactions
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Abstract

The effects of depressed mothers' touching on their infants' behavior were investigated during the still-face situation. 48 depressed and nondepressed mothers and their 3-month-old infants were randomly assigned to control and experimental conditions. 4 successive 90-sec periods were implemented: (A) normal play, (B) still-face-no-touch, (C) still-face-with-touch, and (A) normal play. Depressed and nondepressed mothers were instructed and shown how to provide touch for their infants during the still-face-with-touch period. Different affective and attentive responses of the infants of depressed versus the infants of nondepressed mothers were observed. Infants of depressed mothers showed more positive affect (smiles and vocalizations) and gazed more at their mothers' hands during the still-face-with-touch period than the infants of nondepressed mothers, who grimaced, cried, and gazed away from their mothers' faces more often. The results suggest that by providing touch stimulation for their infants, the depressed mothers can increase infant positive affect and attention and, in this way, compensate for negative effects often resulting from their typical lack of affectivity (flat facial and vocal expressions) during interactions.

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