Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Role of Age and Verbal Ability in the Theory of Mind Task Performance of Subjects with Autism

Francesca G. E. Happé
Child Development
Vol. 66, No. 3 (Jun., 1995), pp. 843-855
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1131954
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1131954
Page Count: 13
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Role of Age and Verbal Ability in the Theory of Mind Task Performance of Subjects with Autism
Preview not available

Abstract

A number of studies have reported that most children with autism fail theory of mind tasks. It is unclear why certain children with autism pass such tests and what might be different about these subjects. In the present study, the role of age and verbal ability in theory of mind task performance was explored. Data were pooled from 70 autistic, 34 mentally handicapped, and 70 normal young subjects, previously tested for a number of different studies. The analysis suggested that children with autism required far higher verbal mental age to pass false belief tasks than did other subjects. While normally developing children had a 50% probability of passing both tasks at the verbal mental age of 4 years, autistic subjects took more than twice as long to reach this probability of success (at the advanced verbal mental age of 9-2). Possible causal relations between verbal ability and the ability to represent mental states are discussed.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[843]
    [843]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[844]
    [844]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
845
    845
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[846]
    [846]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
847
    847
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[848]
    [848]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
849
    849
  • Thumbnail: Page 
850
    850
  • Thumbnail: Page 
851
    851
  • Thumbnail: Page 
852
    852
  • Thumbnail: Page 
853
    853
  • Thumbnail: Page 
854
    854
  • Thumbnail: Page 
855
    855