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Peer Status in Boys with and without Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Predictions from Overt and Covert Antisocial Behavior, Social Isolation, and Authoritative Parenting Beliefs

Stephen P. Hinshaw, Brian A. Zupan, Cassandra Simmel, Joel T. Nigg and Sharon Melnick
Child Development
Vol. 68, No. 5 (Oct., 1997), pp. 880-896
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1132039
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1132039
Page Count: 17
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Peer Status in Boys with and without Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Predictions from Overt and Covert Antisocial Behavior, Social Isolation, and Authoritative Parenting Beliefs
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Abstract

Because of the centrality of peer relationship difficulties for children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), we investigated behavioral (overt and covert antisocial activity), internalizing (self-reports and observed social isolation), and familial (authoritative, authoritarian, and permissive parenting beliefs) predictors of peer sociometric nominations among previously unfamiliar, ethnically diverse ADHD (N = 73) and comparison (N = 60) boys, aged 6-12 years. Authoritative maternal parenting beliefs and negatively weighted social isolation explained significant variance in positive peer regard; aggression, covert behavior, and authoritative parenting beliefs were the independent predictors of both negative peer status and peer social preference. We extended such predictions with statistical control of (1) child cognitive variables, (2) maternal psychopathology, and (3) ADHD versus comparison status. It is important to note that aggression predicted peer rejection more strongly for comparison than for ADHD boys, but authoritative parenting beliefs were stronger predictors in ADHD than in comparison youth. We discuss family-peer linkages regarding peer competence.

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