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Parent Influences on Adolescent Peer Orientation and Substance Use: The Interface of Parenting Practices and Values

Karen Bogenschneider, Ming-yeh Wu, Marcela Raffaelli and Jenner C. Tsay
Child Development
Vol. 69, No. 6 (Dec., 1998), pp. 1672-1688
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1132139
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1132139
Page Count: 17
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Parent Influences on Adolescent Peer Orientation and Substance Use: The Interface of Parenting Practices and Values
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Abstract

This study examines how experiences in the family domain may magnify or mitigate experiences in the peer domain, and how processes in both milieus may influence adolescent substance use. The data derived from 666 European American mother-adolescent dyads and 510 European American father-adolescent dyads. Consistent with individuation-connectedness theory, mothers' responsiveness lessened their adolescents' orientation to peers, which, in turn, reduced adolescent substance use. This process was moderated by maternal values regarding adolescent alcohol use; that is, the relation of maternal responsiveness to adolescent substance use depended on the extent of maternal approval or disapproval of adolescent alcohol use. Among fathers, closer monitoring was directly associated with less adolescent substance use, with stronger effects among fathers who held more disapproving values regarding adolescent alcohol use. Theoretical, methodological, and pragmatic implications are given.

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