If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Correlates of Attachment at School Age: Maternal Reported Stress, Mother-Child Interaction, and Behavior Problems

Ellen Moss, Denise Rousseau, Sophie Parent, Diane St-Laurent and Julie Saintonge
Child Development
Vol. 69, No. 5 (Oct., 1998), pp. 1390-1405
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
DOI: 10.2307/1132273
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1132273
Page Count: 16
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Correlates of Attachment at School Age: Maternal Reported Stress, Mother-Child Interaction, and Behavior Problems
Preview not available

Abstract

The contribution of attachment, maternal reported stress, and mother-child interaction to the prediction of teacher-reported behavior problems was examined for a French-Canadian sample of 121 school-age children. Attachment classifications were assigned on the basis of reunion behavior with mother when the children were between 5 and 7 years of age. Maternal reported stress and mother-child interaction patterns were assessed concurrent to the attachment measure, whereas behavior problems were evaluated both at ages 5 to 7 and 7 to 9 years. Security of attachment significantly predicted the likelihood of school-age behavior problems: Controlling/other children were most at risk for both externalizing and internalizing problems across both age periods. Younger ambivalent children presented clinical cut-off levels of externalizing problems, and older avoidant boys had higher internalizing scores. Patterns of maternal-reported stress and mother-child interaction differed across attachment groups and contributed to prediction of school-age behavior problems, partially mediating the relation between attachment and adaptation. Results support the importance of attachment in explaining school-age adaptation and validity of attachment coding for children of this age.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[1390]
    [1390]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1391
    1391
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1392
    1392
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1393
    1393
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1394
    1394
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1395
    1395
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1396
    1396
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1397
    1397
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1398
    1398
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1399
    1399
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1400
    1400
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1401
    1401
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1402
    1402
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1403
    1403
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1404
    1404
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1405
    1405