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Not Proved: Reply to Wynn

Ann Wakeley, Susan Rivera and Jonas Langer
Child Development
Vol. 71, No. 6 (Nov. - Dec., 2000), pp. 1537-1539
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1132496
Page Count: 3
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Not Proved: Reply to Wynn
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Abstract

Findings on whether young infants look longer at incorrect addition and subtraction have been inconsistent or, as in our study, negative. We hypothesize that imprecise ordinal calculating with very small numbers of objects develops in late infancy and precise calculating in early childhood.

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