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Why Recessions Don't Start Revolutions

Minxin Pei and Ariel David Adesnik
Foreign Policy
No. 118 (Spring, 2000), pp. 138-151
DOI: 10.2307/1149675
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1149675
Page Count: 14
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Why Recessions Don't Start Revolutions
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Abstract

Western policy makers fret that economic turmoil will topple nascent democracies. Not quite. A closer look at 50 years of financial crises in Asia and Latin America suggests that democratic governments may be better equipped to survive economic woes than your everyday strongman.

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