Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

The Search for the Origins of the Chinese Manuscript of Matteo Ricci's Maps

John D. Day
Imago Mundi
Vol. 47 (1995), pp. 94-117
Published by: Imago Mundi, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1151306
Page Count: 24
  • Download ($45.00)
  • Cite this Item
The Search for the Origins of the Chinese Manuscript of Matteo Ricci's Maps
Preview not available

Abstract

In 1986 the Kendall Whaling Museum (Sharon, Massachusetts) acquired a panel of a Chinese map as an example of the Chinese representation of the monstrous fish (whales) mentioned by Herman Melville in his assessment of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century depictions of whales. Only later was the panel identified as a rare seventeenth-century variation of Matteo Ricci's world map of 1602. In this paper, the museum's map is compared with other manuscript and printed maps by Matteo Ricci. Discussion centres on the origins of the manuscript copies of Ricci's 1602 map and their inter-relationships. A census of woodblock prints of Ricci's maps (1602, 1603, post-1644) and of the Chinese manuscript copies is included. / En 1986 le Musée Kendall de la pêche à la baleine a acquis une carte murale chinoise comme exemple de la représentation par les Chinois du poisson monstrueux (baleine) citée par Herman Melville dans son inventaire de descriptions de baleines aux 18e et 19e siècle ("Moby Dick", chapitres 58-60). C'est seulement par la suite qu'on constata que cette carte était une rare version murale du 17e siècle de la carte du Monde de 1602 de Matteo Ricci. Dans cette étude, on confronte la carte de ce Musée avec d'autres cartes manuscrites et imprimées de Matteo Ricci. La discussion se concentre sur les origines des copies manuscrites de la carte de Ricci de 1602 et sur leurs rapports. On a joint une liste des impressions de bois des cartes de Ricci (1602, 1603, après 1644) et de ses copies manuscrites par les Chinois. / In 1986 erwarb das Kendall Whaling Museum eine Holztafel einer chinesischen Karte als ein Beispiel einer chinesischen Darstellung für einen riesigen Fisch (Wal), durch Herman Melville in seiner Liste von Waldarstellungen aus dem 18. und 19. Jhdt. erwähnt ("Moby Dick", Kapiteln 58-60). Erst später stellte sich heraus, daß es sich bei dieser Karte um eine Tafel einer seltenen Variation aus dem 17. Jhdt. handelt mit einer Darstellung von Matteo Ricci's Weltkarte von 1602. In diesem Artikel wird die Museum-Karte mit anderen bekannten handschriftlichen und gedruckten Karten von Matteo Ricci verglichen. Die Diskussion stellt die Originale der Handschrift-Exemplare von Ricci's Karte aus 1602 und deren Wechselbeziehungen in den Mittelpunkt. Ein Zensus der Holzschnitt-Drucke von Ricci's Karten (1602, 1603, post-1644) und der chinesischen Handschrift-Exemplare wird ebenfalls geboten.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
94
    94
  • Thumbnail: Page 
95
    95
  • Thumbnail: Page 
96
    96
  • Thumbnail: Page 
97
    97
  • Thumbnail: Page 
98
    98
  • Thumbnail: Page 
99
    99
  • Thumbnail: Page 
100
    100
  • Thumbnail: Page 
101
    101
  • Thumbnail: Page 
102
    102
  • Thumbnail: Page 
103
    103
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[104]
    [104]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
105
    105
  • Thumbnail: Page 
106
    106
  • Thumbnail: Page 
107
    107
  • Thumbnail: Page 
108
    108
  • Thumbnail: Page 
109
    109
  • Thumbnail: Page 
110
    110
  • Thumbnail: Page 
111
    111
  • Thumbnail: Page 
112
    112
  • Thumbnail: Page 
113
    113
  • Thumbnail: Page 
114
    114
  • Thumbnail: Page 
115
    115
  • Thumbnail: Page 
116
    116
  • Thumbnail: Page 
117
    117