Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

The Loonkidongi Prophets and the Maasai: Protection Racket or Incipient State?

Paul Spencer
Africa: Journal of the International African Institute
Vol. 61, No. 3, Diviners, Seers and Prophets in Eastern Africa (1991), pp. 334-342
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1160028
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($1.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
The Loonkidongi Prophets and the Maasai: Protection Racket or Incipient State?
Preview not available

Abstract

The Maasai are widely assumed to be a highly egalitarian society whose past success in dominating their neighbours owed much to the advice of their Prophets ("loibonok", 'laibons'). This article examines the practice of divination and prophecy in relation to the reputation of and the beliefs surrounding the principal family of Maasai Prophets, the Loonkidongi. Undermining the egalitarian ideal, which is shared by the Maasai themselves, the Loonkidongi are shown to have been accepted as an elite. Throughout the twentieth century they have continued to dominate the Maasai in initiating and controlling sorcery, giving protection on the one hand and fostering the belief in Maasai vulnerability on the other. Living apart from other Maasai, with more wives and larger herds, with their own dynasty and dynastic feuding, with their penetrating mystical powers and networks of influence, the Loonkidongi have the symbolic trappings of a superior class of rulers. From this point of view the Maasai are not egalitarian, but are the clients of a protection racket that in pre-colonial times amounted to an incipient state. Today the Prophets continue to wield influence and are accorded more power popularly than elsewhere in eastern Africa, where surviving traditional rulers have been subordinated to the imposed state apparatus of colonial and post-colonial government./Les Masai sont perçue comme une société très égalitaire dont les conquêtes doivent beaucoup à la guidée de ses prophètes ("Loibonok", 'laibons'). Cet article analyse les pratiques divinatoires et prophétiques liées à la réputation et aux croyances entourant la principale famille des prophètes Masai, les Loonkidongi. Contrairement à l'idéal égalitaire des Masai, cette famille semble avoir été acceptée comme élite. Pendant tout le XXe siècle, les Loonkidongi ont dominé les Masai par l'initiation et le contrôle de la sorcellerie, assurant la protection d'une part et en entretenant la croyance dans la vulnérabilité des Masai, d'autre part. Vivant à l'écart des autres Masai, avec un plus grand nombre d'épouses et de plus grands troupeaux, avec leur propre système dynastique et ses luttes internes, avec la pénétration de leurs pouvoirs mystiques et de leurs réseaux d'influence, les Loonkidongi ont tous les attributs d'une classe dirigeante supérieure. Dans une telle perspective, les Masai ne forment pas une société égalitaire, mais sont les clients d'un système de protection qui, à l'époque pré-coloniale, ressemblait à un état naissant. De nos jours, les prophètes continuent d'exercer leur influence et jouissent de plus de pouvoir, au niveau populaire, que tout autre en Afrique de l'Est où les chefs traditionnels ont été soumis par le gouvernement colonial ou post-colonial.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[334]
    [334]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
335
    335
  • Thumbnail: Page 
336
    336
  • Thumbnail: Page 
337
    337
  • Thumbnail: Page 
338
    338
  • Thumbnail: Page 
339
    339
  • Thumbnail: Page 
340
    340
  • Thumbnail: Page 
341
    341
  • Thumbnail: Page 
342
    342